Jean Danet, Bagyeli Pygmy man, drinks whisky from a plastic packet on a logging road to the old growth Congo rainforest near the boundary of the US$567 million Kribi deepwater seaport under construction the China Harbour Engineering Company.  Cameroon near the border of Equatorial Guinea.  Jean Danet, believes that life will return to normal after the completion of the deepwater seaport but the damage forest in which he stands is designated to be a planned city for 80,000 new residents.  2013   
 Massive rainforest tree on its way to a distant sawmill.  Logging trucks transport trees cut in the distant rainforest southeast of Kribi stream through the small city 7 days a week.  Kribi, Cameroon.  2013
 The Congo Basin rainforest crowds a pristine beach littered with dugout fishing pirogues (canoes) at the village of Ebodje, Cameroon.  This entire village and shoreline lies within the new Chinese-funded Kribi deepwater seaport's 260 square kilometer land use area which calls into question whether there will be an Ebodje village in the future at all.    Ebodje is a typical rural village squeezed between the rainforest and the Atlantic.  Most villages, like Ebodje, are inhabited by the majority Bantu peoples strung out along a slender unpaved road.  There are also several Bagyeli Pygmy semi-nomadic communities near the coast road, where they trade with the Bantu and then return to the deep forest, where they hunt and gather forest products.  2013
 Clouds of dust and odd hillocks left to allow electric wires to remain in place in building site for the new US$567 million Chinese-funded Kribi deepwater seaport under construction by the China Harbour Engineering Company.  85% of the funding is coming from China, with the remaining 15% coming from Cameroon.   Most analysts agree Cameroon lacks a highly trained workforce, meaning that its people will miss out on employment opportunities generated by the project.  2013   
 Chinese-built truck, one of a legion of trucks, ferrying stone passes in front of this Bagyeli Pygmy settlement, as it goes to and from a new quarry as part of the US$567 million Kribi deepwater seaport construction project by the China Harbour Engineering Company.  85% of the funding is coming from China, with the remaining 15% coming from Cameroon.     The port is being built on a remote and pristine coastline and expansive rainforest hundreds of kilometers from the nearest city and will facilitate the development of environmentally destructive industries like iron ore, alumina, cobalt and nickel from a series of mining projects due to come into operation over the next half decade; along with logging already prevalent in the area.    The seaport will decrease the transportation costs to export the unprocessed raw materials, thus losing the opportunity to create jobs for Cameroonians and government revenues from value added industries like lumber mills, or refining of minerals.  2013
 Jean Danet, which his child who has a distinct distended belly,  Kwashiorkor, from malnutrition in a  Bagyeli Pygmy settlement near the boundary of the US$567 million Kribi deepwater seaport under construction the China Harbour Engineering Company.  Apparently the promised benefits of the infrastructure project have not trickled down to this Bagyeli community.  Cameroon near the border of Equatorial Guinea.  2013   
 A sign board declares that this village has been built to house people relocated by Razel, a company that is working with China Harbour Engineering Company constructing the US$567 million Kribi deepwater seaport.  2013
 Eikanda Marie, Jean Danet's wife, breastfeeds her infant son in their settlement near the boundary of the US$567 million Kribi Deepwater Seaport under construction the China Harbour Engineering Company.  Cameroon near the border of Equatorial Guinea.  2013   
 Sign in Chinese characters at an intersection where a legion of Chinese-built dump trucks ferry stone between this road leading to a stone quarry used for landfill as part of the US$567 million Kribi deepwater seaport construction project by the China Harbour Engineering Company.  85% of the funding is coming from China, with the remaining 15% coming from Cameroon.    2013  Most analysts agree Cameroon lacks a highly trained workforce, meaning that its people will miss out on employment opportunities generated by the project.  Most of the drivers are Chinese nationals. 
 Chutes de la Lobe waterfall along Cameroon's wild southern coast is one of the few waterfalls that empty into the sea.  Near Kribi, Cameroon.  2013
 Tractor trailer, that shares this unpaved main highway between Kribi and the deepwater seaport with pedestrians, motorbikes, etc., has run off the road and tipped over.  Cameroon.  2013
 Traditional medicines from the rainforest, including bubinga tree bark (an aphrodisiac), ebom-afan (for infertility), tali (erythrophleum ivorense, usde for diarrhoea, dysentery or as a pain-killer) for sale in a market in Kribi.  25% of modern pharmaceuticals are derived from rainforest plants, including novacaine (anesthetic), cortisone (a steroid used to reduce inflamation and pain), quinine (treats malaria), vinblastine (an alkaloid used to treat Hodgkin's lyphoma, non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer and testicular cancer), to name a few.  It is well-known that the largely intact rainforests, about to be decimated by multiple mega-projects south of Kribi, are likely reservoir for new medicines yet unknown to modern science.  2013
 Jean Danet, Bagyeli Pygmy man, follows a logging road to the old growth Congo rainforest near the boundary of the US$567 million Kribi deepwater seaport under construction the China Harbour Engineering Company.  South of Kribi, Cameroon  2013
 Dead black-casqued hornbill (Ceratogymna atrata) found along a logging road in the forest near the boundary of the new Kribi Deepwater Seaport.  The black-casqued hornbill is considered vulnerable because their numbers in West and Central Africa have decrease more than 30% in the past decade.  All the rainforest near the Bagyeli settlement nearby is either in the seaport's 26,000 ha concession or zoned for logging.  Cameroon.  2013
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