The Rio Napo already a broad river 50 km (31 miles) from the Andes stretches out into the Amazon Basin.  Coca, Ecuador.  2014  This major tributary to the Amazon River is at the heart of a river system that carries petroleum contaminants from Ecuador's extensive oil drilling activities into once pristine forests, including INSIDE the boundaries of Yasuni National Park.
 "Afectados" (Affected Ones): Oil derrick towers above students, with their pet toucan, in front of their elementary school, where they must endure the noise, noxious fumes and the dust raised by heavy trucks associated with the petroleum business.  Near Dayuma along Via Auca.  Ecuadorian Amazonas.  2014
 Over a dozen or more petroleum pipelines pass directly in front of a house on the main highway, Via Auca, where trucks pass every day.  Oil exploration not only continues on indigenous land, it has expanded into Yasuni National Park.  South of Coca, Ecuador.  2014  Via Auca is a road that extends south from the city of Coca.  Coca began as a solitary airstrip for a military outpost in the mid-1960's.  The Huaorani were referred to as the "Aucas" or "savages" by their indigenous neighbors, the Kichwa.  The Via Auca, which extends south from Coca opened up territory where the "uncontacted" lived. 
 "Afectado" (Affected One): Davo Enemenga, a Huaorani man whose ancestral land has been contaminated by oil exploration by Chinese government-owned, Petro Oriental.  "They promised to help us (the local Huaorani residents) and and did not, says Enomenga.  They caused us problems.  They paid us nothing, no cash (his word, "silver" coins or cash).  They cheated us".  Proveta, south of Coca, Ecuador.  2014  According to the company website, "PetroOriental S.A. are companies established through capital provided by state-run firms from the People's Republic of China.  These include: China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) with 55% shareholder participation and China Petrochemical Corporation (SINOPEC) with 45% shareholder participation." 
 Peligro (Danger)!  Environmental activist, Donald Moncayo, standing hands plastered with petroleum sludge left behind in a "piscina", or pool, decades ago by Texaco, now owned by Chevron, at a depleted well in the Amazon rainforest near Lago Agrio.  Every oil well in that era would have an unlined pool dug at the site where the discarded, low grade petroleum would be dumped, allowing it to seep into the ground and eventually into the water table.  The Amazon basin experiences heavy downpours all year round and these pools were fitted with overflow pipes for times of heavy rain, allowing the petroleum to overflow directly into nearby rivers greatly spreading the toxic contamination.  In the Ecuadorian Amazonas.  2014
 "Afectado" (Affected One): Chick nibbles from the ankle of a Huaorani man, suffering from a skin condition, who says that "petroleros", or oil company workers, suggested that petroleum be used as a skin lotion.  It was presented to him as one of the "benefits" that oil exploration would bring to the village of Yawapare off of Via Auca.  Then, he developed these patches of irritation on his legs.  Yawepare, Ecuador.  2014
 "A petrolero" (oil company worker) watches a tanker truck filled with petroleum from an open-air restaurant as it rolls through central Dayumi along the Via Auca, clogged with shops and pedestrians (including a mother carrying her baby above the wheel to the right).  Ecuador.  2014
 Environmental activist, Donald Moncayo, enters a banana grove which sits on top of a former  "piscina", an unlined pool dug at a oil drilling site where the discarded, low grade petroleum was dumped, allowing it to seep into the ground and eventually into the water table.  Near Lago Agrio in the Ecuadorian Amazonas.  In a previous legal settlement, Texaco, now owned by Chevron, supposedly decontaminated this site, removing all toxic petroleum.  Moncayo digs down 1 1/2 meters (5 feet).  Ground water immediately seeps into the hole that is so laced with petroleum that, when ladled out into a cup, petroleum coats his rubber gloves black.  2014
 Ecuadorian boatman, Ronny Cox, stands before a massive buttressed roots of a Ceibo tree in the core ITT block of Yasuni National Park, only accessible by boat and then on foot.  President Rafael Correa proposed to forbid drilling for petroleum in this core area as part of his Yasuni-ITT Initiative in 2007, if and only if international donors raised US$3.6 billion, equal to half the value of the estimated reserves lying below this bio-hotspot.  (Drilling for oil is already taking place in other areas of Yasuni National Park.)  The initiative failed spectacularly as only US$13 million were raised.  The Yasuni-ITT Initiative, through which the Ishpingo, Tambococha, Tiputini Rivers run, was terminated on 15 August 2013.  Although 78% - 90% of Ecuadorians opposing drilling in this sensitive environment, the government has begun to let oil companies in.  2014
 Water, highly contaminated by petroleum waste, gathers around a slurry-waste injection compressor inspected by Jose Aveiga, the landowner.  The slurry-waste injection compressor is supposed to safely return waste petroleum slurry safely thousands of meters back into the earth from where the petroleum came at this exhausted well, but it leaks petroleum waste into the environment, where it has soaked into the water table.  Cattle manure can be found around this pit because the cattle drink the contaminated water.  In turn, the family consumes the beef and dairy products from their herd.  Via Auca near the Rio Tiputini, Ecuador. The oil company paid Aveiga US$12/year to occupy this hilltop on his 80 hectare farm.  Via Auca near the Rio Tiputini, Ecuador.  2014
 Petroleum-laced water fills a concrete pit from where it often overflows from the exhausted drilling site and continues to contaminate Jose Aveiga's land.  The oil company paid Aveiga US$12/year to occupy this hilltop on his 80 hectare farm.  Cattle droppings can be found around this pit because the cattle drink the contaminated water.  In turn, the family consumes the beef and dairy products from their herd.  Via Auca near the Rio Tiputini, Ecuador.  2014
 Sinopec, a Chinese state-owned company and the world's 5th largest company is active in Huaorani territory.  Its Ecuador-based joint-venture is called, PetroOriental S.A.  2014
 It is through the kitchen and diet that petroleum contamination most often enters residents' bodies who live near oil exploration sites.  Teresa Ogona Flores' kitchen, typical of the standard of living for the Mestizo migrants who have settled along Via Auca in the past 3 decades.  South of Coca, Ecuador.  2014   
 "Afectado" (Affected One): Troya Rosillo, whose farm has been contaminated by a still-active oil drilling site, with his pet parrots obtained from a remnant of forest on adjacent indigenous Kichwa land.  Along Via Auca, south of Coca.  Ecuador.  2014
 "Afectados" (Affected Ones): A Huaorani grandfather, suffering from a skin condition, spends quiet time with his grandchild in a traditional thatched structure.  He says that "petroleros", or oil company workers, suggested that petroleum be used as a skin lotion.  It was presented to him as one of the "benefits" that oil exploration would bring to the village of Yawapare off of Via Auca.  Then, he developed patches of irritation on his legs.  Yawepare, Ecuador.  2014
 Depiction of the "Aucas", or "Savages" in the garden of Hotel El Auca.  The Kichwa would regard their Huaorani neighbors as savages ("Aucas"), because of their warlike ways, and lack of clothing.  Coca, Ecuador.  Most of the clientele at the Hotel El Auca are "petroleros" (petroleum industry workers).  Photographs of Huaorani living in a manner no longer possible, largely because of the environmental degradation that has resulted from their clientele's oil exploration, gives the restaurant a sadly ironic Amazonian theme park feel.  2014
 A traditional communal lodge used by Huaorani hunters and their families when they go into the rainforest, but they must be careful in the forest here because a breakaway group of self- imposed uncontacted (no contactos) Huaorani, called the Taromenani, live nearby.  In 2013, a Taromeneni war party murdered Huaorani elder, Ompore Omeway and his wife, Buganey in this forest near the boundary of Yasuni National Park.  The Huaorani retaliated, massacring roughly 20 Taromenani.  There has been no resolution to this conflict, exacerbated by the encroachment of oil companies into the last pristine rainforests, including Yasuni National Park.  Near Yawepare, south of Coca.  Ecuadorian Amazonas.  2014
 Brilliant rainforest flower (Brownea Macrophylla) sprouts from the trunk of a tree, typical in the rainforest, in the controversial ITT core zone of Yasuni National Zone.  Ecuador.  2014
 Sign at Hotel El Auca in Coca welcomes employees of multinational behemoth, Halliburton.  The big international players in the petroleum industry are present in the Ecuadorian Amazonas, including the corporation that former US Vice-President Dick Cheney ran from 1995 - 2000.  Halliburton became infamous worldwide for its role in the Iraq War from which the Financial Times reports it earned a profit of US$ 39.5 billion through its subsidiary, Kellogg Brown and Root.  Coca, Ecuador.  2014
 The floating world of Rio Tambococha in Yasuni National Parks core ITT section, as rafts of vegetation encroach upon the pristine "black" waters.  President Rafael Correa proposed to forbid drilling for petroleum in this core area as part of his Yasuni-ITT Initiative in 2007, if and only if international donors raised US$3.6 billion, equal to half the value of the estimated reserves lying below this bio-hotspot.  (Drilling for oil is already taking place in other areas of Yasuni National Park.)  The initiative failed spectacularly as only US$13 million were raised.  The Yasuni-ITT Initiative, through which the Ishpingo, Tambococha, Tiputini Rivers run, was terminated on 15 August 2013.  Although 78% - 90% of Ecuadorians opposing drilling in this sensitive environment, the government has begun to let oil companies in.  2014
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